Editor-in-Chief Ufuk Demirkılıç Frequency Quarterly Abbreviation Turk J Vasc Surg Publisher Turkish National Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Society ISSN 2667-4947 E-ISSN 2667-5080



Turkish Journal of Vascular Surgery 2020 , Vol 29 , Issue 2
Current treatment of peripheral infected wounds: Our vacuum-assisted closure experiences
Taner İyigün1, Barış Timur1, Gülbeyaz Sevin Özgül2, Zinar Apaydın1, Çiğdem Tel Üstünışık1, Ünal Aydın1
1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
2Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
DOI : 10.9739/tjvs.2020.617 Objectives: In this study, we present our experiences on peripheral vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) applications in our clinic.

Patients and methods: Between January 2012 and December 2019, a total of 64 patients (40 males, 24 females; mean age 67.9 years; range, 35 to 94 years) undergoing peripheral VAC therapy were retrospectively analyzed. The VAC system was changed at weekly intervals, until a negative culture was obtained or laboratory values returned to normal ranges and were not suggestive of infections.

Results: In 16 patients (25%), the main indication for VAC was previous femoral pseudoaneurysm repair. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated strain from the wound site. The mean length of hospital stay was 54.1 days.

Conclusion: Peripheral wound infections cause a significant increase in the length of hospital stay, cost, and mortality. Vacuum-assisted closure applications may reduce these rates. It is an ideal method to be used throughout surgery to fight against surgical site infections. Keywords : Cost analysis, negative-pressure wound therapy, peripheral vascular diseases, surgical wound infection